CFTTC 2022
March 2-4, 2022

 
Presentations

 
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PresenterPresentation
Burge, Dylon
PSD







Time: -
Location:
Bridging the Distance with Technology

This session will cover several resources that can be used whether you are in the classroom teaching, or if you are teaching online. We will go over free resources such as the G Suite tools, Flipgrid, virtual escape rooms, museums etc. We will also cover some paid for virtual tools such as Screencastify, WeVideo, Prodigy, Merge Cubes, and Cospaces edu. A link to my presentation and my contact information will be given out during the session.


Ive, Burnett
MS Community College Board




Co-Presenters: James Burnett, Joe Burnett


Time: -
Location:
This is an example of my session Title

We live in an age of baroque album rollouts. Drake had his billboards. Kanye had his troika of gaudy stadium shows, including a literal homecoming in Chicago. But it’s hard to make a case that either of the long-time superstars presided over a more masterful rollout than the 22-year-old Lil Nas X. His debut album Montero is out today, and it’s a triumphant moment for Nas as an artist who has proven not only that he’s no one-hit wonder, but also that he’s a true mastermind of the modern art of attention. No matter what is thrown Lil Nas X’s way, he’s always in on the joke, and he dictates the cultural conversation in a way most celebrities could never. Let’s look back at the long road to Montero.


King, Stephanie
Mississippi State University







Time: -
Location:
Pulled in a Dozen Different Directions: Helping Adult Learners Succeed

Of community college students, 21% of full-time and 39% of part-time are age 25 or older (National Center for Educational Statistics, 2019). Many have tried college before and failed and are now stuck in low-paying jobs and desperately seeking to improve their lives. These adult learners face numerous challenges to attain postsecondary credentials including work and family responsibilities, limited income, and low academic preparation. Due to time and travel constraints, many choose to enroll in online programs even if they lack the technological knowledge and resources, as well as independence and motivation, to successfully complete coursework. This presentation will explore options for using technology to serve this population effectively. Supports can be provided from the time a student first browses a college’s website looking for a program, through the admissions and advising process, during coursework, and as the student graduates and seeks employment.


Pate, Amy
STARKVILLE Oktibbeha Consolidated School District







Time: -
Location:
Imagine Engagement with Nearpod!

This session will introduce educators to the possibilities that Nearpod can provide to transform their classroom. In this session, educators will learn how to use Nearpod to create engaging activities for their students and open up a world of possibilities that are only limited by their imagination. We will take a tour of Nearpod's activities and content library and create a Nearpod presentation together.


Cantrell, Kelly
East Mississippi Community College







Time: -
Location:
Tech & Techniques for Managing Student Engagement in a Hyflex Class

This session discusses a few best practices learned over the past year (or so) while teaching in a hyflex environment at a community college. The focus of the session will be on tools that can assist a faculty member in embracing the digital transformation that the Covid-19 pandemic has wrought on higher education. It will explore actionable steps for managing the impact of hyflex or student choice models in the classroom while preserving academic rigor and student interest in the subject matter. Finally, we will examine the necessary pedagogical shift for this environment and technologies to inspire each student to fully engage in both the classroom experience and the learning process.


Sellers, Kimbra
Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College




Co-Presenters: Kim Sellers, Ph.D., Amy Stanfeld, Ph.D.


Time: -
Location:
Enhancing Sense of Community in the Online Environment

We live in an exciting time for educators. The addition of technologies such as artificial intelligence, interactive computer technology, video conferencing software, and other emerging technologies can help us to improve our quality of teaching. However, we must not forget the human touch that should always be foremost when offering quality instruction. Enhancing Sense of Community (SoC) in the online environment can improve performance, enjoyment, and retention, for BOTH faculty and students. As educators, we are concerned about building healthy classroom communities in our online and hybrid courses. Many times, instructors get caught up in the belief that they must be in the physical presence of their students in order to create a sense of community; but according to McAndrew, Dyke, Fell, and Nussbaum (2018), being in a classroom does not always translate into the students feeling that they are a part of a community. Educators should be intentional in creating an environment conducive to engagement, social interactions, and overall community, whether they are meeting with their students in person or virtually (Maeda & Rosen, 2020). Research involving online learning has indicated that several techniques in the design and delivery of online instruction can increase students’ SoC, commitment to the course, and overall learning experience. Developing community is important throughout the semester and it is often considered a top priority at the start of the semester (Parker, 2016). Sometimes during the busy parts of the semester, this priority is forgotten. We aim to make the case that maintaining a strong online presence to improve SoC can be easily implemented if one makes it a priority. The Community of Inquiry (CoI) theoretical framework (Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2001) is one of the better known and most researched approaches to designing learning experiences for the online environment. We will discuss the use of a collaborative-constructivist learning design in combination with three interdependent elements: social, cognitive, and teaching presence. “These presences have been shown to be the most significant variables in the success and effectiveness of learning in an online environment” (Maeda & Rosen 2020). Additionally, we will discuss the use of specific strategies that can help develop SoC in an online learning environment. We will highlight how these strategies can often not only enrich SoC, but also enrich the learning experience, increase student autonomy, improve pedagogical practices, improve attrition among students, and improve faculty attrition. What are the BEST practices to achieve the goal of enhancing sense of community in online learning? STRATEGIES THAT WE WILL DISCUSS: 1. Begin with a strong introduction to your course: • Consider making a trailer, much like you would see for a new movie! • Find out what interests your students • Have a strong syllabus with clear objectives • Set up clear guidelines for how to navigate your course. Keep navigation consistent. Remember, confusion is the enemy of attrition. 2. Foster connections with your students and facilitate connections with each other: • Keep a notebook (digital or paper with 1 page per student to help track and maintain what you learn throughout the course. You can use this information to connect content to the students’ interests. • Create a “coffee break” discussion board where participants can regularly post personal or anecdotal information. • Connect using humor. Remember that it’s hard to read tone in text so use graphics, videos, emojis, and other methods to ensure students recognize it as humor. • Model and teach good discussion board etiquette 3. Whenever possible personalize your course. • Choose fonts carefully. Use color with care • Use Power Points and long lecture notes with care • Provide accessible documents • Provide a variety of delivery systems • Use video and audio when possible 4. Provide meaningful feedback: • Always address students by name and keep track of what you learn about individual students to help reinforce the bond • Send out individual emails (not a group email) to each student with THEIR name on it and ask them to reply. • Have students give feedback to each other in a structured manner. 5. Be sure that your students feel psychologically safe within your classes: • Show empathy. Be approachable and sense when your students need help and support by recognizing changes in behavior. • If a student has not submitted their work, reach out to them to find out why. Allow extra time if there is a valid reason for the tardiness of the assignment. 6. Let your students get to know you: • Create a discussion forum, where you introduce yourself. • Provide some personal information including a picture, and ask students to provide similar introductions. • Include personal information that you feel comfortable sharing (i.e. hobbies, work experience, family, pets, etc.) in your instructor profile in the learning management system (LMS) and encourage students to do the same. References Garrison, D. R., Anderson, T., & Archer, W. (2000). Critical inquiry in a text-based environment: Computer conferencing in higher education model. The Internet and Higher Education, 2(2-3), 87-105. Maeda, M. & Rosen, L. (2020). How to Establish a Strong Community in an Online Course. The Free Language Technology Magazine. Retrieved from https://fltmag.com/community-online-course/ McAndrew, A., Dykeman, T., Fell, C., & Nussbaum, B. (2018, October 25). Unpacking the Student Experience in Large Lectures. Retrieved from https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2018/10/unpacking-the-student-experience-in-large-lectures Parker, E. C. (2016). The Experience of Creating Community: An intrinsic case study of four midwestern public school choral teachers. Journal of Research in Music Education, 64(2), 220–237. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022429416648292


Wang, Shuyan
USM







Time: -
Location:
The Best Practices of Online Teaching

This presentation discusses the strategies and practices of designing, developing, and delivering a technology-enriched online course. This presentation will also provide an overview of multimedia tools for screen capture, audio and video materials creation, adding different types of questions to videos, and how these tools can be integrated into teaching and learning. Teaching strategies and practices as well as different communication tools and issues/concerns when integrating these tools into an online class are illustrated with actual examples used in a graduate online class. This presentation intends to demonstrate how to create an effective online learning environment and teach efficiently.


Winton, Bradley
The University of Southern Mississippi







Time: -
Location:
Emotional Intelligence and the Stress of a Digital World

The digital world we all find ourselves in creates a constant stream of stressful events. Whether digesting social media posts, the bombardment of emails, or the sudden and prolonged work from home situation many of us find ourselves in, the digitization of learning and work has created a need for us all to expand our intrapersonal abilities. Specifically, emotional intelligence abilities provide an individual with the adaptability, stress tolerance, and impulse control to react more positively to the emotionally laden events that come with our digital world. Through emotion awareness, emotion expression, managing others’ emotions, and self-regulating one’s own emotions, we can more effectively deal with digital distress. Wild swings between supremely positive and extremely negative emotions during one’s life can have a disconcerting effect. Without regulation, a roller coaster of emotional events may lead to feelings of insecurity. The goal of this session is to allow participants to realize the power of emotional intelligence in their daily interactions with digital stimulus and to learn techniques to limit the effects of stressful events.


Parker, Mary
University of Houston-Downtown







Time: -
Location:
Use of Technologies to Support Virtual Mentoring During COVID-19

The purpose of this presentation is to examine how student-centered mentoring could be taken to the virtual environment out of necessity due to the COVID-19 quarantine impact on the university and STEM undergraduates. Urgency associated with maintaining relationships and support were supported through a variety of emerging technologies and media. Use of Zoom video-conferencing software and GroupMe phone applications provided primary platforms for ongoing conversation and support. A clear structural framework along with established procedures were instrumental in maintaining our virtual mentoring program through implemented technologies. A comparison model established during the Houston Hurricane Harvey as a mechanism to maintain communications formed the basis for expanding the model to incorporate greater dimensions of relationship building in addition to communication. An anticipatory mindset assisted the pre-COVID-19 environment thought patterns to development standard operating procedures for maintaining previously established mentoring relationships and building more in-depth relationships. Data portraying virtual mentoring through the various Zoom and GroupMe media will be offered as evidence of mentoring moving into the virtual environments and successfully being used to maintain not just communications, but support of 1) stress, 2) emotional stress, 3) friendship, and 4) academic support systems. Transcripts of GroupMe and Zoom meetings will be available in aggregate. In our university society today, we must be prepared to maintain relationship-building in alternative environments given the environmental chaos we find ourselves exposed to. Hurricanes, earthquakes, flooding and fire events, pandemics, and other will never cease and some scientists suggest may become even more prominent as common occurrences. Mentoring is vital/ crucial to the success of any undergraduate, but especially our first-time-in-college who in many cases already bring cultural and learning gaps to their university experience. This is true under normal circumstances, but especially true in COVID-19 situations.


Terry, Glenn
University of Southern Mississippi







Time: -
Location:
Big Data - What Is It?

Big Data – What is all this talk about Data Analytics – This session is designed to provide a high-level overview of the world of Big Data and what is meant by Data Analytics. It will include discussions of the importance of visualization presentation techniques, including the cognitive drivers of the recipient's response to such visualizations. The session will provide insight into the possibilities as to how Big Data is and will change the business world and educational curricula. Additionally, the session will discuss recent employer surveys regarding needed team member analytical skills and suggested changes by certain professional organizations to business school's curriculum related to topics such as data analytics, IT acumen, and cybersecurity.


Wilhite, Christa
Mississippi Community College Board







Time: -
Location:
TL;DR: Simplifying Online Instruction

One effect on post pandemic instruction is an increased interest in teaching online from faculty who were previously focused on traditional instruction. The massive move to online learning in 2020 improved efficacy with LMS technologies and motivated many to try their hand at online instruction on a regular basis. With the demand for online learning opportunities growing, this is fantastic news, but many eLearning offices are left saying "So you think you can teach online?" Online instruction isn't as easy as recording full length lectures and posting handouts within the LMS. This session will feature a few tips for simplifying instruction to keep up with the TL;DR culture in which today's students thrive.


Smith, Trevor
Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College




Co-Presenter: Brian Carriere


Time: -
Location:
All About Blockchain and the Cryptocurrency Revolution: Part 1

This presentation will discuss how blockchain technology began with Bitcoin, the first cryptocurrency, and is now on track to revolutionize the global economic, industrial, and information sectors. Education will also be impacted by this major paradigm shift. The presenters will discuss blockchain’s structure and function as well as popular use cases, challenges, and potential areas of future mass adoption. This session is particularly noteworthy, as blockchain use and cryptocurrency ownership is growing much faster than the Internet in the 1990s, and every person on the planet will be significantly affected by it within the next five years.


Carriere, Brian
Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College




Co-Presenter: Trevor Smith


Time: -
Location:
All About Blockchain and the Cryptocurrency Revolution: Part 2

This presentation is designed for those that attended the blockchain session Part 1 as well as for attendees that have a basic understanding of blockchain and cryptocurrency. The presenters will discuss blockchain use cases in more detail as well as the mechanisms that give cryptocurrencies their underlying value. Topics will include smart contracts and the role that they will soon play in education. Also, the presenters will explain non-fungible tokens (NFTs) and their revolutionary potential. Additional topics will include decentralized finance (DeFi), Internet of things (IoT), and the rise of alternate blockchain platforms such as Ethereum, Cardano, and VeChain. Other noteworthy issues related to the blockchain space will be covered as time permits.


Donohue, Monica
MGCCC




Co-Presenter: Emma Miller


Time: -
Location:
Lit, Cool, Rad, and Hip Communication for Generations

Communication is part of each generation’s DNA. From Boomers to Gen Z, each group is unique in their communication needs and learning preferences. Participants will learn to identify characteristics of each generational cohort’s communication preferences. Examples and activities will provide participants an opportunity to transform this knowledge into an instructional superpower. The workshop will focus on generational communication strategies that maximize student learning and retention.


Roberts, Marie
Lauderdale County School District







Time: -
Location:
Spill the Tea: Content Delivery Made Easy

It's time to get the scoop on how teachers are teaching face-to-face, live online, and recording for later viewing, all at the time same, and without driving IT folks crazy with tech help requests or pulling their hair out in the process. The challenges of supporting multiple modalities of instruction are great; how can we ease the burden and let teachers focus on their content? Enter ExplainEverything, an online interactive whiteboard app where people share and learn. I'm spilling the tea - come see and hear how our school district is using EE to drive instruction across multiple content areas and learner demographics. Session participants should include educators (PK-20), admins, and IT folks who, after the session, will be able to describe the tool and its benefits, list possible use cases, and collaborate in a whiteboard in real time as part of the learning process.


Gillespie, Denise
Itawamba Community College




Co-Presenters: Wilson Knight, Rilla Jones


Time: -
Location:
Using Learning Management Systems to Optimize Institutional Processes

Learn how ICC uses Canvas to conduct faculty evaluations, facilitate graduation practice, and streamline safety information for students and faculty. This session will feature three ways an LMS was utilized for operational efficiency and transparent, real-time information sharing. Online evaluation courses provide a clear model of performance expectations, transparent ratings, and a downloadable file for archival purposes. Covid concerns have dominated the minds of educators and administrators since March 2020. Creating Safely Together courses for students and faculty assisted the College with dispersing rapidly changing information and confirming receipt and acceptance of safety protocols. Building a fully online Commencement Rehearsal course provided a virtual space for ticket claim and regalia pickup, along with preparing students for commencement without the need for an onsite rehearsal. Using Canvas for these initiatives helped create a familiar and user-friendly product for students and faculty, and it also streamlined the process of identifying and communicating with users who did not access or complete requirements.


Knight, Wilson
Itawamba Community College




Co-Presenter: Denise Gillespie


Time: -
Location:
From Outdated to Automated: How MS Power Automate® Optimizes Work Proc

This session will provide an overview of how Itawamba Community College (ICC) uses Microsoft Power Automate to boost efficiency by automating mundane, repetitive tasks. Using low-code, click-and-point tools to create rule-based “flows” in Office 365, ICC was able to quickly process internal forms, manage approvals, and create a robust internal archive for documentation and accountability. In addition to providing a basic orientation to Power Automate, this session will also share some examples of Automate-in-action to help illustrate the capabilities of the platform and how it can be easily implemented to eliminate the busywork of internal documentation. Examples include a multi-level, multi-user approval process for remote proctoring accommodations; advising records; and registrar forms.


Britt, Margaret
Copiah-Lincoln Community College







Time: -
Location:
Imagine It! Endless Solutions with Microsoft

Come and learn about the latest updates and new features in Microsoft Desktop and Web Applications infused with Artificial Intelligence.


Edwards, Elizabeth
Itawamba Community College




Co-Presenter: Rilla Jones


Time: -
Location:
Taking the Strategic Pain Out of Strategic Planning

With COVID concerns and more distributed, remote-working employees, institutions must meet the challenge of building consensus and establishing priorities that support and promote long-term planning while also meeting the documentation needs of external oversight agencies like accreditors. Moving the strategic planning process online by using a course/module application has many advantages. 1) The online course is an effective way to reach your decision-makers regardless of the number involved or if they are local or distant. 2) You can leverage the built-in course assessment options as a way to collect and report on the strategic process questions. 3) The course modules provide an efficient way to organize and categorize your internal and external data, surveys and market analysis so that your decision-makers have the information they need in considering broader goals. 4) The course is a great way to provide adequate and appropriate data analysis that culminates into consensus-driven reporting, which will serve as the foundation for goal-setting. The presentation focuses on both the technical requirements of setting up the strategic planning course and the organizational framework that ensures your strategic planning process will address all the requirements to fulfill appropriate and adequate data-sharing and goal setting needs.


Trest, Michael
Jones College




Co-Presenters: Wendy Evans, Jennifer Griffith


Time: -
Location:
Online Workforce College: Digital platform meeting workforce demands

If there are any positives coming out of COVID-19, it would be the power of innovative individuals, organizations, and communities to think differently and exemplify what can be achieved when people are united by common priorities, specifically digital solutions designed to meet Mississippi’s workforce needs. Jones College and Mississippi Community College Board (MCCB) staff will introduce the audience to the Online Workforce College (OWC), a fully-online, self-paced learning platform designed to help people gain work-ready skills as well as assist employers deliver and track online pre-hire and professional development training for their organization. OWC’s current content areas, available 24/7, include Industrial Training, Manufacturing, Logistics; Employability/Soft Skills; Workplace Safety; Information Technology; and Adult Education. All courses are aligned with employer input and industry standards, and as students complete courses, they earn digital badges signifying to employers they have the skills needed for the job! With the support from MCCB, Jones College’s innovation to collaborate with internal and external partners to create pathways equipping individuals at all educational levels while meeting the needs of the employers is proving to be a win-win in Mississippi.


Beene, Connie
Certiport







Time: -
Location:
Close the Skills Gap with Certifications

Certiport offers a wide variety of industry-recognized certifications which can make a difference in salary and career options. These credentials are aimed at closing the skills gap, and enhancing individual productivity, marketability and value. Find out about the practice exams and learning products designed to increase student success in the digital world. All attendees will be provided demos for curriculum options and practice testing as well as a certification voucher.


Walters, Kim
Mississippi State University







Time: -
Location:
Imagine: Launching a New Course into a Pandemic!

In Fall 2015, we began to pilot a co-requisite model for College Algebra in an attempt to provide students, who had a lower Math ACT (MACT 17 or 18), with an opportunity to complete College Algebra with support from material typically covered in Intermediate Algebra. Unlike most models, this does not give students credit for Intermediate Algebra, but allows them to take and hopefully pass College Algebra with an additional support system in the form of small lab sections with tutors and review material. We “piloted” this course for 5 semesters as we integrated it into our traditional College Algebra course and planned to see it become a stand alone course in the Fall 2020. Little did we know at the time that we would be launching it into a full blown pandemic. Using some in-person teaching and some livestreaming via WebEx, we learned more than we anticipated. In this presentation, I will discuss what we have done and what we changed along the way and what the full blown class looked like. We saw success in the pilot and did continue to see success in the full course. While it was not exactly what we hoped, the results were positive. I will discuss what worked, what we learned, and what we changed as we have transitioned back to "normal" in the Fall 2021.


Myers, Julie
SmarterServices







Time: -
Location:
Humanizing Virtual Proctoring

The pandemic prompted the creation of a new proctoring modality known as Hybrid Virtual Proctoring (HVP) which combines the security and deterrent of a live, human proctor with the efficiency and scalability of virtual proctoring. School personnel such as testing center staff, faculty, teaching assistants, or eLearning staff can serve as the virtual proctor. One of the criticisms that providers had about automated virtual proctoring during the pandemic was that artificial intelligence when working autonomously does not have the power to stop an assessment when an anomaly is detected. This gap in response time could seriously endanger the assessment content. But with HVP, when a live person is monitoring an exam, they can make that judgment call and stop the exam if needed. HVP can also achieve a scale of efficiency not possible when schools try to proctor using a tool such as Zoom. The HVP interface in SmarterProctoring allows one live, human proctor to simultaneously monitor up to ten test takers. HVP is superior to Zoom in that it couples artificial intelligence with live monitoring. It also provides 24/7/365 support to all candidates, performs device compatibility checks, and a lockdown browser.


Zuehlke, Jason
Mississippi Delta Community College







Time: -
Location:
Keeping Simplicity through Complexity

Why don’t we like starting something new? Probably because it involves adding another piece of software or hardware, complex integrations, or learning curves just to complete something simple. Why implement something new and complex when we may already have a simpler solution currently available? Join this session to review some simple, and existing, solutions to “complex” new initiatives brought forward from the pandemic and new initiatives. This session will include general applications as well as specific examples of “keeping it simple” to reduce the complexity while providing high quality of service.


Clark, Julie
Hinds Community College




Co-Presenter: Latoya Clark-Horne


Time: -
Location:
Morph Your Course

It's Morphin Time! Do you want to morph your course into an engaging user experience for your students? Come to this session to learn about some fun tech tools that can enhance your course. We will look at presentation tools like Genially that can replace those boring PowerPoints and IORAD to create interactive tutorials. Tired of Kahoot? Let’s power up with Blooket. In this session, we will explore each of these tools and discuss how they increase student engagement and how they can seamlessly be incorporated into your existing Canvas course shells.


Greenhaw, Blake
Cengage Learning







Time: -
Location:
Addressing affordability and access using Cengage Unlimited

Panel discussion with several Mississippi CC leaders that are using innovative ways to address affordability and access. This will include Q&A time.


Kmiec, John
University of Southern Miss., College of Business and Economic Development







Time: -
Location:
Where the heck did everybody go?

Where the heck did everybody go? In August 2021, in the wake of the Covid-19 Pandemic, 4.3 million workers were reported to have left their jobs in what has been called The Great Resignation. As employers, governments, scholars, and the media debate what to do, the Nation is struggling to retain skilled talent and fill the many job openings needed to compete in an ever-changing, hyper-competitive, digitally connected world economy. Skill shortages are nothing new, but the current situation has underscored the problem with rising food and gas prices, product shortages of all kinds, and diminished services across sectors. This presentation will explore the ongoing race to attract, develop, and retain our most valuable resource. A highly skilled and innovative workforce!


Latham, Amy
Northwest Mississippi Community College




Co-Presenters: Miriam Rowan, Dave Curran


Time: -
Location:
Innovations in Higher Ed using Oracle Technologies

In this session participants will learn about what Oracle Cloud has brought to the table at Northwest Mississippi Community College with their ERP, Human Capital Management and Student Financial Planning cloud technologies. Northwest has implemented these technologies and is bringing cutting edge digital innovation to their employees and students, with plans to add additional Student Management applications in the future. The cloud technology is unlike the days of old with the traditional ‘what you see is what you get’ software. Although the applications come with out of the box functionality, with the help of an implementation partner you can configure system workflows and tweak the system to function as needed following best practice guidelines. If you are finding yourself looking for new ways to eliminate manual processes, use technology to provide greater efficiency in your environment and improve the student experience, look no further because this session is for you.


Moss, Laurie








Time: -
Location:
Software Testing and Quality Assurance for ALL Technology

Presentation will include brief background of how I started in the Software Testing field. What is software testing. What is Quality Assurance. What technologies need software testing. How to start a career as a Software Test Engineer (training and other resources). Questions and Answers.


Khan, Abu
Jackson State University







Time: -
Location:
Teaching STEM Courses Using Technology: Lessons From The Pandemic

Disruption in academic institutions created by the pandemic is highlighted in this session designed for all instructors. Involuntary adoption of online teaching in courses that are traditionally offered through face-to-face meetings in majority of institutions created some unforeseen difficulties and unexpected advantages. Even though most instructors of in-person lecture-based courses use some form of online supplements, they invariably encountered difficulties in selecting a proper and effective platform for offering the course totally online. Dealing with the individual need of a student with issues of (a) insufficient background knowledge, (b) irregular attendance, (c) critical thinking ability, (d) practice and solve real-life problems, (e) retention, and (f) satisfactory performance in the course require methods different from the traditional ones. Method of student evaluation is challenging and time-consuming. A synchronized online classification of the course appears to be more effective. A comparison of student performance for online courses to those offered previously as traditional courses will be presented.


Swanson, Adam
MGCCC




Co-Presenter: Mollie Barger


Time: -
Location:
Improving Data Upload Efficiency -An Internal Error Reporting Model

Learn how to establish processes at your institution to clean-up data in the system and optimize upload efficiency. Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College designed a series of automated error reports that get sent out to various departments on a weekly basis. This session will cover how to setup an error reporting infrastructure and detail from an Admissions Office perspective, how error reports are being worked throughout the semester.


McAfee, Ouida
Delta State University







Time: -
Location:
Building Consistency in Course Navigation

This session will discuss using your learning management system and rubrics to support faculty in building courses that students can easily navigate across the university.


Johnson, Patrick
Amazon Web Services




Co-Presenters: Brian Speerly, Craig Jordan


Time: -
Location:
Architecting a Data Lake for Higher Education Student Analytics

Architecting a Data Lake for Higher Education Student Analytics One of the keys to identifying timely and impactful actions is having enough raw material to work with. However, this up-to-date information typically lives in the databases that sit behind several different applications. One of the first steps to finding data-driven insights is gathering that information into a single store that an analyst can use without interfering with those applications. For years, reporting environments have relied on a data warehouse stored in a single, separate relational database management system (RDBMS). But now, due to the growing use of Software as a service (SaaS) applications and NoSQL database options, data may be stored outside the data center and in formats other than tables of rows and columns. It’s increasingly difficult to access the data these applications maintain, and a data warehouse may not be flexible enough to house the gathered information. For these reasons, reporting teams are building data lakes, and those responsible for using data analytics at universities and colleges are no different. However, it can be challenging to know exactly how to start building this expanded data repository so it can be ready to use quickly and still expandable as future requirements are uncovered. AWS is helping higher education institutions address these challenges.